Last Minute Webinar Announcement!

Tomorrow, Thursday, June 22, from 2:00 – 3:15 PM, WES Global Talent Bridge will be hosting a webinar entitled “Exploring Reskilling Opportunities for Immigrant Professionals focused on helping immigrants and refugees with professional backgrounds re-enter professional-level jobs.

In this webinar presenters Allie Levinsky from Upwardly Global and Jamie McDermott from the Baltimore Alliance for Careers in Healthcare will discuss best practices for providing career guidance to highly skilled immigrants and refugees as well as current reskilling initiatives.

To register for this webinar click here.

Webinar Alert!

Short to Long Term Economic Integration for Refugee Employment: Using Theory of Change to Implement a Career Advancement Program

July 11, 1:00 PM EST

Supporting clients in obtaining early employment, often referred to as “survival jobs”, is no longer enough. Join Higher, META, and the IRC on July 11th at 1:00 p.m. EST in a discussion of steps you can take to develop new, evidence-based, data-driven programs that meet the longer-term employment goals of your clients:

  • Higher’s Program Manager, Nicole Redford, will discuss the importance of seizing the opportunity to evolve employment programs to address both the short-term and longer-term employment goals of new clients, as well as those who have been here awhile
  • META’s Technical Advisor, Jaime Costigan, will walk through how to use a theory of change to thoughtfully evolve your employment programs
  • IRC’s Technical Advisor for Economic Empowerment Programs, Erica Bouris, will provide an example of a career advancement program with impressive evidence-based outcomes.

To register, click here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2260690847922998018 

It’s About Time!

Five Tips for Time Management

When you have limited time and resources, it is critically important to make sure you are using your time well. What tasks end up taking most of your time?

Do those tasks lead to the outcomes you need, or do you find that these tasks are using up important time and energy that would be better spent elsewhere? What can you do to correct course and stay focused on what’s most important?

Consider these tips, inspired by an article entitled “How to Manage Time with 10 Tips that Work,” which was posted a few years ago on Entrepreneur.com:

Do a time study: Track your time for a week to see where it all goes. This will help you identify where adjustments are needed by identifying the areas of your work where you are spending too much or too little time.

Make appointments with yourself: Block out time for your most important tasks, thoughts or conversations. Schedule time to deal with emails and phone calls so that they are not a constant distraction. Unplug (shut off your email or silence your phone) when you have a really important task to work on.

Stay focused on your results: Plan to spend at least 50 percent of your time engaged in the thoughts, activities and conversations that produce most of your results. Job Developers, for example, should be spending at least 50% of their time on employer outreach or activities directly related to obtaining employment for clients.

Plan on interruptions: Interruptions are inevitable, and part of the daily reality of working in refugee employment. Have a plan for how you are going to handle those unexpected client or employer requests. It may look like setting up a specific time to handle those requests (think “office hours”) or it may make more sense to build a cushion into your time that allows for interruptions (maybe assume that 15-20 minutes of every hour will go to something unexpected). Either way, having a plan for these situations will help.

Know what you want to accomplish and evaluate your own performance: Take five minutes before every call and task to decide what result you want to attain, and five minutes afterwards to evaluate how things went. This will help you refine your approach as you go, and make you more effective, whether you are working on case notes or speaking to an employer.

To read the whole article (which includes a few more tips!) from Entrepreneur.com, click here.

What time management strategies do you use in your work? Let us know in the comments section below!

Head, Heart, Hands: A Strategy for Employer Conversations

When I was a rookie job developer just starting out I came up with a little strategy that I would use when approaching employers. I called it Head, Heart, Hands, and it represented 3 simple messages that I wanted to communicate to employers:

  1. Head: It makes good business sense to hire refugees- it will be a good investment.
  2. Heart: I’m doing something positive by hiring refugees- I’m helping someone rebuild their life.
  3. Hands: It will make my life easier to work with this job developer and hire refugees.

Original Sketch, Daniel Wilkinson, Circa 2011

While I had initially thought of the elements of Head, Heart and Hands as the three points on my employer pitch outline, what I began to realize was that it wasn’t as important to hit all three points, but rather to identify which of the elements was the driving motivation for the employer.

Some employers’ primary concerns may be business issues such as high turnover, frequent employee absences, lazy workers, or issues affecting their bottom line. For these employers you take the “Head” approach and emphasize how your clients will meet the employers’ need where past employees have fallen short. You might highlight client retention rates, strong work ethic or the Work Opportunity Tax Credit incentive.

Other employers just need workers fast. They’re looking for an easy solution to their current labor shortage. For those employers, you take the “Hands” approach, and emphasize how you can solve that problem by getting them work-authorized, motivated and dependable employees quickly.

Finally, there are employers out there who get really excited about the “Heart” aspect. Some may be immigrants or descendants of immigrants and identify with the struggle from that perspective. Others may just have a strong motivation to help others. Although the “business case” is typically much more effective than the “charity pitch,” if you can tell that an employer is really excited to help refugees from more of a humanitarian perspective, then run with it!

Do you have a go-to strategy that you use when walking into a meeting with an employer? Let us know at information@higheradvantage.org or in the comments section below!

Free Job Development Webinar June 27- Space Limited!

Mark your calendars for an upcoming FREE webinar from our friends at DTG-EMP/Kenfield Consulting.

The webinar, “3 Red Hot Issues Every Successful Job Developer Must Address” will take place on Tuesday, June 27, from 9-10 AM Pacific Standard Time and will give an overview of the basics of the Consultative Selling model – a job development model designed for those assisting job seekers with significant barriers to employment.

The webinar will focus specifically on the following:

• How to Convince employers to hire a candidate they would typically reject
• How to Assess clients for motivation to work and when motivation is an issue implement basic intervention techniques that work
• How to Find employers who will hire candidates with employment barriers

This webinar is limited to 200 registrants, so visit www.dtg-emp.com to sign up now!

How can Consultative Selling help refugee employment programs? Listen to what Ryan Overfield, Manager of Refugee Education and Employment Programs at
Lutheran Family Services of Nebraska, had to say about his staff’s experience implementing this model:

For more on Consultative Selling, check out Higher’s Consultative Selling Resource Pack, located in the Downloadable Resources section of our website.

“Why I Love What I Do”

Dallas Refugee Employment Staff on What Keeps Them Going

Happy Monday! At a recent Higher workshop in Dallas, TX (which we highlighted in last Monday’s post) we asked the participants to share one reason why they love working in refugee employment services.

Here are a few of our favorite answers:

  • Every day we make a difference in our client’s lives
  • Waking up every day and working with people from all over the world
  • Working with coworkers who are like family and are passionate about the work that we do
  • Getting to watch the process of refugees going from knowing nothing [about life in the US], to getting jobs, paying taxes, starting businesses, and becoming citizens
  • As a former refugee, I do this work to give back
  • Seeing clients come back after a couple years and seeing how they are succeeding
  • Making great connections between clients and employers
  • Through empowering our clients it empowers me
  • Everything I do for my clients contributes to this great nation

We hope these reflections from your colleagues in Dallas will be a positive way to start your week!

What inspires you to do work with refugees? Let us know in the comments section!

Job Readiness Instructors from several Dallas and Fort Worth agencies participate in an activity during Higher’s workshop on April 6, 2017.

Higher Texas Workshops Recap

Last month Higher was in Texas where we conducted 1-day workshops in both Houston and Dallas. In each location we brought together employment staff and resettlement directors representing 12 local resettlement offices from 6 of the 9 national resettlement agencies. The workshops were full of interactive activities focused on best practices in refugee employment, local collaboration, and strategies for success at a time when many refugee resettlement offices and employment teams are going through significant changes.

As is the case with all Higher events, we walked away inspired by the dedication and commitment that refugee employment staff bring to their work and the resiliency and creativity that the staff we interacted with in Texas are applying to their current challenges. We were also encouraged to hear about the outpouring of support that programs are experiencing both from surrounding communities and employers.

Thanks to all of the staff who participated in our workshops in Texas! You have provided us with valuable insight into your work which will inform our technical assistance activities for the next several months.

Here are some photos from the events:

Omar Al Sammarraie, a Job Developer at Interfaith Ministries of Greater Houston, contributes his thoughts to an activity highlighting current challenges and opportunities in refugee employment.

 

Andre Shango, a Job Developer at Catholic Charities in Houston, reports out for his group on our activity discussing the elements of successful refugee employment programs.

 

Job Developers from Dallas and Fort Worth, TX

Webinar: Investing in Refugee Entrepreneurs

Join us May 17 at 1:00 PM EDT!

Studies show that refugee entrepreneurs, with community support and backing, contribute greatly to our local and national economies. In this webinar, Welcoming Refugees and Higher, an ORR technical assistance provider for refugee workforce development, will show you how to effectively communicate these contributions, support refugee entrepreneurs as part of your current work, and build greater community awareness and support.

In this webinar you will learn how to:

  • Communicate three ways that refugee entrepreneurs economically contribute to your community
  • Identify two ways that employment programs can support refugee entrepreneurs as part of your work
  • Articulate two concrete suggestions for ways that your organization can increase community awareness and support for refugee entrepreneurs

Featured Speakers:

  • Hannah Carswell, Program Manager, Welcoming America
  • Nicole Redford, Program Manager, Higher
  • Diego Abente, VP and Director of Economic Development Services, International Institute of St. Louis

REGISTER HERE NOW

Models for Integrating Language and Workforce Development Skills

A few months ago, I had the opportunity to attend a 1-day conference at Johns Hopkins University’s American Institute for Contemporary German Studies in Washington D.C. The theme of the conference was “Integrating Migrants into the Workforce” and focused on immigrant integration efforts in both Germany and the U.S.

One of the most interesting presentations I heard was by Dr. Heidi Wrigley from Literacy Work International. The Presentation focused on models in the U.S. that are leading the way in offering both English instruction and vocational training.

Here are four models that Dr. Wrigley highlighted:

McDonald’s: English Under the Arches

English Under the Arches (EUA) is one of four Archways to Opportunities programs designed to help employees grow professionally.

The program launched in 2007 with the mission to provide English as a Second Language (ESL) classes that teach managers and crew the English they need to communicate effectively and confidently with customers, staff and in their lives outside of McDonald’s.

These classes are free for employees and they are also paid their hourly wage while they are in class. Helping non-native speakers learn English allows them to break down barriers and feel comfortable when communicating effectively with fellow team members, customers, and, most importantly, in their everyday life.

Proficiency in English is often a prerequisite for most jobs in the U.S. and provides mobility for individuals to pursue higher education opportunities, which in turn leads to increased earning power. To learn more about this program, visit the EUA webpage or read the most recent Archways to Opportunity Progress Report.

Seattle Office of Immigrant and Refugee Affairs: Ready to Work

Ready to Work (RTW) is a workforce development program in Seattle, WA designed for immigrants and refugees who face barriers to gaining employment.

The program combines English as a Second Language (ESL) classes with computer literacy instruction and case management to help immigrants gain job readiness skills and take steps toward economic self-sufficiency.

RTW was created as a prototype model of English language acquisition offered in a community-based setting, and focused on career development, and employment. Classes meet four days a week, three hours a day, for a total of 12 hours per week.

Instruction is provided by two Seattle Colleges and Literacy Source (a community-based adult education provider). Unlike many other programs, RTW tracks participants’ progress over a longer time frame than conventional funding streams typically allow.

For more details, see National Skills Coalition’s Amanda Bergson-Shilcock’s blog post from June 2016: Ready to work: Seattle creates new on-ramp for immigrant English learners.

Washington State: I-BEST

Washington’s Integrated Basic Education and Skills Training Program (I-BEST) quickly teaches students literacy, work, and college-readiness skills so they can move through school and into living wage jobs faster.

Pioneered by Washington’s community and technical colleges, I-BEST uses a team-teaching approach.

Students work with two teachers in the classroom: one teacher provides job-training and the other teaches basic skills in reading, math or English language.

Students get the help they need while studying in the career field of their choice. The I-BEST program offers several career pathways including Hospitality, Manufacturing and Nursing.

I-BEST challenges the traditional notion that students must move through a pre-determined sequence of basic education or pre-college (remedial) courses before they can start working on certificates or degrees.

The combined teaching method allows students to work on college-level studies right away, clearing multiple levels with one leap.

Check out this video, which features three students sharing their experience with the I-BEST model:

OneAmerica’s English Innovations

English Innovations (EI) is a blended social learning model that integrates English language learning and combines a collaborative, supportive classroom environment with online tools that enable self-paced, independent learning.

Offered as an alternative approach to conventional systems of language instruction which often do not provide the flexibility and resources that adult immigrants need, the EI program includes:

  • Tailored curriculum framework integrating digital literacy skills & language development
  • Blended model for in-class and self-paced learning through online tools and game-based learning
  • A collaborative classroom environment which facilitates cognitive, social and emotional engagement
  • Tutor-facilitated activities, volunteer involvement, and peer support
  • A model grounded in communities, engaging immigrants and immigrant-serving organizations in advocacy for effective English learning and immigrant integration

How do you see ESL and Vocational Training intersecting in your area? Are you aware of an innovative model that we should highlight? Let us know at information@higheradvantage.org.

*Note: Some language in this post was pulled directly from program websites for the purpose of accurately describing these programs.

 

5 Mapping Strategies for Employer Outreach

Aside from language, literacy, and cultural adjustment issues, transportation is one of the most significant barriers to employment that our clients face. While not always possible, finding employment that is easily accessible by foot, bike, or public transportation is ideal. Here are a few mapping strategies that you can use to help your clients overcome this employment barrier:

1. Explore the area immediately surrounding your client’s home. Type your client’s address into Google Maps and zoom in and out to look for grocery stores, restaurants, gas stations, factories, etc. that would be easily accessible for clients. After familiarizing yourself with a neighborhood through Google maps, it’s a good idea to visit the neighborhood, since there are things you will notice in person that you wouldn’t see just by looking at a map on a computer screen.

2. Use a map of your city’s public transportation system to inform your employer outreach efforts. Start by looking at a paper map or maps that may be available on your city’s public transportation website. Then go to Google Maps, and find transportation lines near where your clients live and follow them to see what businesses are along these routes. Another fun thing to do is to drive public transportation routes as you are doing employer outreach. Sometimes you will see businesses that may not be listed on Google Maps.

A sample of results for Google Maps search: “manufacturing near Chicago”

3. Search for target industries or major employers in the neighborhood, city or region where your clients live. For example you could search for “manufacturing near Pittsburgh, PA” or “Hotels in New Orleans.” Research the largest employers are in your area to see how accessible these employers are for your clients. Where Are the Jobs? is a very helpful website that you can use to obtain labor market information for your area.

4. Start with areas of the city your clients are already familiar with. Take a look at a map with your client or just have a conversation to find out which areas of the city they travel to on a regular basis. If a job opportunity were to open up in an area they are already familiar with and comfortable traveling to, chances are they will be positive about that job and will be likely to be successful there.

5. Use maps to advocate for your clients. Maps can come in handy as visuals in conversations with employers or with your R&P (Reception and Placement) department. With employers, you can use maps to prove that transportation will not be a problem, pointing out the exact transportation lines that your clients will use, and that the transportation schedule will coordinate with the work schedule. With your R&P colleagues, you can use maps to show which neighborhoods are best situated for easy access to employment opportunities. Employment departments and R&P departments may want to consider doing strategy 1 (above) together as a strategy for increasing collaboration on housing and employment.

One rule of thumb for public transportation: Try to keep commute times to an hour or less and avoid having clients take more than two modes of transportation (e.g. switching buses). When the commute is longer than an hour and clients have to take more than 2 modes of transportation, it is almost inevitable that they will struggle to make it to work on time or that they will end up quitting their jobs because the commute is just too overwhelming.

Hopefully, these tips will help you find jobs closer to home for your clients, as well as improve job satisfaction and retention. Let us know if you have other innovative mapping strategies at information@higheradvantage.org!