Understanding Client Motivations

What do your clients really care about? What has motivated them in the past, and what will inspire and push them forward as they start work in the U.S.?

The answers to these questions might significantly affect employment decisions. As Roy E. Disney said, “It’s not hard to make decisions when you know what your values are.”

Here are some creative ideas for learning about your client’s personal motivators that can be carried out in job readiness classes or during one-on-one meetings:

  1. Value cards: Cultural Orientation Resource Exchange (CORE)’s employment section of CO curriculum includes a sorting activity, where participants use photo cards to show what reasons for working are least/most important to them. Examples of the photo cards included: to gain respect in my community, to support my family, and to earn money to go to school in the future.

These two ideas come from an article by Herky Cutler[1]:

  1. Photography: Ask your client to take a dozen pictures of important things in his or her life, using a cell phone. As you review the photos, ask what each image represents, think of how it might related to a job setting, and ask on a scale of 1-10 how important it is to have that as an aspect of work.
  2. Music : Ask your client about a favorite song – one that has personal meaning or significance — and listen to it together if possible, even if you don’t understand the language! Ask questions to learn why it’s significant and how your client relates to the message.

Not only will learning about your client’s personal values help inform your approach, but these self-reflective exercises will remind clients of specific motivators they can rely on when things are challenging at work.

[1] Engaging Client Assessment Tools That Rock! From Career Convergence Web Magazine, February 2017.

Post written by Carrie Thiele

A Few Ways to Engage Volunteers in your Employment Program

With all the changes over the course of FY17, Higher has learned that many offices have seen a surge of interest from community volunteers.

Though it can be time consuming to bring on volunteers, when volunteers are involved in the resettlement process they can become powerful community advocates on behalf of refugees.

Here are a few specific ways you can use volunteers in key program areas.

Job Readiness

  • Filling out mock job applications with clients: Gather various job applications from employer websites or places of business. Have volunteers practice filling out applications with clients for the jobs that they are interested in. Focus on any English words that may be confusing or new to clients.
  • Assisting with Job Readiness training: Volunteers can help teach job readiness class or meet 1-on-1 with clients to review key concepts or help them to prepare for job interviews. Mock interviews with individuals or small groups is a great way to prepare for job interviews.
  • Assisting with Transportation: Volunteers can provide transportation for clients searching for jobs nearby or attending job interviews. Once a client accepts a position, volunteers can assist with learning routes to and from a job or assist with arranging transportation if the job requires work at times when public transportation may be inconsistent (e.g. Sundays or night shifts).
  • Financial Literacy: Volunteers can help teach financial literacy courses or provide one on one training to clients. This includes helping clients to open a bank account or complete personal budgets.

Job Development

  • Researching available jobs: With a client by their side, have volunteers research employment opportunities near bus lines or within walking distance of the client’s home.
  • Recruiting potential employers: Have volunteers tap into their networks – work, church, sports teams, family, etc. – to see if anyone they know is interested in hiring refugees.

Post-Placement Assistance

  • Helping clients maintain employment: Once a client is employed, ask a volunteer to sit down with him/her and review the importance of timeliness, not missing work, appropriate dress and proper work behavior.

How do you utilize volunteers in your programs? Write to us at information@higheradvantage.org to share your stories.

For more ideas on engaging volunteers, check out these previously published Higher blog posts:

Understanding a Paycheck Resource

Understanding Your Paycheck eLearning

Meet Amal, who tells her story to help other refugees thrive in the U.S. workforce.

Looking for a great tool on how to understand a paycheck? Higher has developed the perfect tool for you and your clients. Our eLearning module Understanding Your Paycheck, is available through Higher’s Online Learning Institute.

Here are five reasons to check out this resource, according to your peers:

  1. It takes less than six minutes to complete the course.

“The module is really well developed and covers all the aspects of the paycheck in a very short duration of the time.”  Bidur Dahal, Education Trainer at Lutheran Family Services Rocky Mountains

2. It’s a great addition to any job readiness class.

“This module was a great tool. I thought it was very user friendly and clear. We will use this in our first job readiness class in April.”  Lauren Brockett, Director of Employment Services at Friends of Refugees – Cafe Clarkston

3. Or maybe to employment orientation.

“It clarifies the paycheck, pay stub and deductions very well. I am really excited about this module and will be very happy to present it to my clients. I will try to make it part of my employment orientation.”  Kawa Hawari, Lutheran Social Services of North Dakota

4. It feels more like a story than a training.

“I thought it was excellent! I definitely see this as a great job readiness workshop resource. We talk to our clients about understanding pay stubs in detail, but I like this module so much because there’s a story to it—it makes it so much more relatable. Looking forward to being able to use this for our clients! ” Tawni Floyd, Employment Manager at World Relief Tri-Cities

5. It covers more than just the basics.

“I just viewed the paycheck module. It is great! It is short, so that will make it easy to show in class with interpreters. I also like the emphasis on respectfully talking to your boss if you think there is a problem with your paycheck. I love these modules.”  Jessica Ploen, Employment Training Specialist at Lutheran Family Services of Nebraska

 

An eLearning Resource: Interview Behavior Videos

Ever wanted to be able to show clients what a bad interview looks like? Well you are in luck, check out Higher’s Online Learning Institute. You can access the complete module right now with your username and password.  If you aren’t already taking advantage of our 13 eLearning courses, sign up here for instant access to these videos and the other eLearning courses.

Here are 4 things to know about this exciting new resource:

  1. There are two short videos with examples of good and bad interview behaviors.
  2. You can also get transcripts and suggestions for using the module with clients in the companion resource section.
  3. More than 20 resettlement programs across the country are using our eLearning courses in their job readiness activities.
  4.  The job seekers in the videos are refugees. Thanks to them and to African Community Center (ACC), Denver, CO for helping out.

Here’s a sneak peek at Interview Behavior Videos. 

Email Higher at information@higheradvantage.org to let us know what you think, how you’re using our latest eLearning resource and what else would be helpful.

Job Readiness Activities for Adult Learners

Last week in Denver, attendees in the job readiness session participated in an activity to list the tools, resources and activities they currently use with clients.  Here’s the combined list.  If possible, a link to a version of the activity is included.  If you have a different version of any activity, or you have any resources to add, please contact us so we can update the list!

Interview Practice

Mock Interviews

Record Clients & Play Back for Client

Practice Interview Questions

Interactive Activities

Job Readiness Bingo

Body Language Activities

Flash Card Bowling

Welcome Circle: Begin Class by Asking Everyone Name, Origin, Languages and their First Job

First Day: Classroom Expectations – Importance of Classroom Success

Incorporating Certificates after Job Day Trainings

Resume Jeopardy

Skills

Identifying Skills that Refugees Have – Physical vs. Personal Skills

Explain How to Transfer Skills

Look at Job Listing Examples and ask, “Do you have the skills?”

Presentations

Picture Heavy PowerPoint

Visual Resources

Pictures

Describe Career Dreams Using Pictures

Videos

Videos to show the Work Done at Different Jobs

Quality Control Video – Quality, Quantity

Cards

Realia – Safety Gear

Higher Resources

Higher Advantage Modules

U.S. Job Cycle Visual (page 2)

Guided Practice

Mock Hotel Environment – Practice

Dishwasher Training at Location

Time Clock Practice

Time Clock for Attendance

Production Line Simulation

6-Day Training Spurts (short-term)

Applications & Resumes

Resume Preparation

Filling out Applications

Applications Planted at Businesses

In Class Resume Building (Skeleton Version)

Practice Application

Job Search

How to Find Jobs

Digital Literacy

Computer Lab

Mobile Computer Labs

Group Discussions

Small Group Discussion about Hygiene & Dress

Small Groups – Have clients create their own business & say what skills are needed for job

Specific Training Topics

Safety Classes: Use signs with Pictures, explain what signs mean. Explain the importance of reporting issues

Lessons on Trauma and the Impact of Trauma

Workplace Culture (i.e. handshakes & other non-verbal communication)

Job Security/Responsibility to Communicate with Supervisors (2 weeks notice)

Coworker relationships, manners, mannerisms

Hygiene, Grooming

Transportation – Teaching bus lines

English Instruction

Translated Materials

Mandatory ESL

Teach Job-Appropriate Vocabulary

Community Partnerships

Clothing Donations as Incentives

Local Library Partnerships

Adding Social Enterprises into your Curriculum

Financial Literacy

I-9 & W-2 (Tax & Pay)

Explain Payroll, Direct Deposit and Tax Forms

Assist with Opening Bank Account

Translators/Interpreters

Record Videos of Interpreters

Assessments

Go Over Pre-Employment Assessment (Reading Comprehension)

Mock Interview/Application Process as Assessment

Other

Self-Reflection

Tour at Companies

CORE

Childcare (Paid Employees)

One-on-One Pre-Employment Counseling

Wish List

More Tactile Activities

Child Care Resources – Toys for Kids

Notes

Factoring in Trauma when making Job Placements

Meat Packing isn’t good for People with Trauma

How to Gain the Attention of Learners – Video & Infographic

One of today’s sessions in Denver is titled “Job Readiness Activities for Adult Learners“. The session is designed around the LIRS eLearning module, Adult Learning Principles, and focuses on seven steps to ensure learning, beginning with gaining the attention of learners. 

The session will begin with “The Balloon Game”, a fun activity that is easy to connect to the competitive nature of the U.S. job market. The short video below (an excerpt from Adult Learning Principles) explains how to conduct the activity.

 

Next week, we’ll share a list of tools, activities and resources that are effective in job readiness classrooms across the country. In the meantime, the below infographic has tips for gaining the attention of your audience so they are motivated and ready to learn, whatever comes next.

Please contact us for access to Adult Learning Principles in Higher’s Online Learning Institute

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Simple Strategies to Address Common Barriers, Part 5

Unrealistic ExpectationsAt a recent Maryland-wide workshop which focused on refugee workforce development, Higher had participants do a brainstorming activity, in which groups worked together to list common barriers refugees face to employment as well as possible solutions.

These types of activities inevitably generate a “wish list” of solutions which are great ideas but not always in our power to implement quickly (e.g. adding staff members, ESL at work sites, home-based self-employment for refugee women).

While there are certainly times to pursue those big ideas, perhaps the best thing about exercises like this is that they allow groups to identify simpler solutions that can be implemented immediately.

Over the past several weeks, we’ve been sharing insights from your Maryland peers, focusing on simple and practical strategies that are relatively easy to implement!

So far, we’ve shared tips for overcoming challenges including transportationchildcare, limited English proficiency (LEP), and challenges related to digital literacy/computer access.  Today we’ll wrap up this series and share a few tips on overcoming the barrier of unrealistic client expectations.

Tips for Managing Expectations:

  • Educate yourself on the information clients receive during pre-arrival cultural orientation (CO) so that you can reinforce important points and/or present new information that may not have been covered in the overseas CO (See Adjusting Expectations: The Cultural Orientation Connection, a recent Higher post by Daryl Morrissey, Cultural Orientation Coordinator at LIRS).
  • Collaborate with R&P cultural orientation staff to make sure that messaging around employment is consistent.
  • Consistent messaging with within office among staff- have a team strategy for how you will handle client expectations.
  • Connect with community leaders to encourage consistent messaging within communities.
  • Set expectations early- have honest conversations about appropriate expectations.
  • Highlight the benefits of two-income households and ensure equality of services to both spouses.
  • Walk the line of hopeful realism. Emphasize the importance of taking that initial survival job while also recognizing the skills, experience and education, your clients bring, and laying out a path and timeline for how they can pursue a fulfilling career over time. Develop short, medium, and long term goals with clients.
  • Mobilize mentors (including former refugees) who will help support clients by giving them realistic expectations and a sense of hope.
  • Educate clients about training programs and career development options.

For more on managing expectations see:

Managing Expectations: When Will You Find Me a Job?

Creative, Participatory Employment Plans that Work

Help Highly Skilled Refugees Look Out the Windshield

Feel free to participate in the conversation by leaving a comment below or sending us an email at information@higheradvantage.org.

Your Top 10 Interview Prep Best Practices

10 Interview Preparation Best Practices10 Interview Preparation Best Practices is a visual collection of your tips, tricks, and best practices for providing clients with the skills they need to successfully interview for employment.

This is the second of five resource sheets from speed dating”, where 120 refugee employment service providers at our Second Annual Refugee Employment  split into small groups and spent 10 minutes discussing each of five topics.

Be sure to download the complete set of notes here. There’s so much great information it was hard to know where to start!

Looking for more interview preparation resources? Through Higher’s Online Learning Institute, we offer several free eLearning modules that you and your clients can access. Consider showing one in job readiness class or one-on-one with clients. Interview Behavior Videos or How to Answer Behavioral Interview Questions are great resources to check out.

We have several other resources in the works, so be sure to check back often. As always, please let us know your ideas for other resources to make your jobs easier.

Adjusting Expectations: The Cultural Orientation Connection

Daryl one
A guest post from Daryl Morrissey, LIRS Cultural Orientation Coordinator

The Department of State Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration (PRM) mandates 15 topics for inclusion in pre-arrival CO and by all resettlement agencies upon refugee arrival in their new U.S. communities.

Employment is one of those topics.  PRM breaks those 15 topics into 64 required sub-topics. All of them are outlined in R&P Cooperative Agreements. For employment, there are six:

  1. Early employment and job retention are essential to survival in the U.S., and must be the primary focus for all employable adults (men and women).
  2. A person’s initial job might not be in their chosen profession.
  3. The refugee himself or herself plays a central role in finding employment in the U.S.
  4. A crucial way of finding better paying jobs is learning how to speak English.
  5. There are general characteristics of U.S. professional and work culture to which refugees must adapt in order to be successful in finding and maintaining employment.
  6. Employees have rights as well as responsibilities in the workplace.

Obviously, there is a LOT more that refugees need to learn about the topic of employment. That’s where job readiness classes and one-on-one employment services play a critical role.

Shifting Attitudes

Employment is included in the list of specific CO topics for a reason. As you look at the sub-topics, you’ll see that a number of them have more to do with refugee attitudes toward working than with factual information about how to succeed in the U.S. workforce.

Some attitudes implied in the six sub-topics listed above are:

I must be willing to work; getting a job is my top priority; and even women (my spouse!) will have to work for us to get by in America.

I must take the first job that is offered to me, even if it’s not what I want to do.

I am responsible for finding and keeping a job – others may help, but the primary responsibility is mine.

I must be willing to make the effort to learn English in order to be employable here.

I have to adapt to U.S. workplace culture.

The Employment component of CO training should complement and reinforce the messages they will be hearing from Employment Service Providers. CO helps refugees begin to make the necessary attitude shifts to find jobs and work.

Adjusting Expectations

Overseas CO may be the first time that many refugees are exposed to the concept of early employment and a “starter job”.

It takes time and repetition for refugees to accept some of the important and difficult employment messages, especially during the initial resettlement period when there is so much to learn for new arrivals. Hearing about them one time in a CO class is unlikely to change opinions, but it can be the beginning of a shift along a refugee’s personal attitude continuum. Front line employment staff experience this daily while helping clients to adjust expectations about their first jobs and long-term career goals.

Using repetition is an effective adult learning best practice. Receiving the same message from multiple sources strengthens the impact. I think of exposing refugees in CO class to helpful attitudes regarding working in America as more of an initial inoculation. The ideas might not ‘take’ the first time, but refugee understanding will build with increased exposure in later employment training and real-life experience.

daryl twoDaryl Morrissey, LIRS’ national Cultural Orientation Coordinator, has over 10 years of overseas refugee CO experience on four continents and with multiple refugee populations, including Karen, Chin, Bhutanese, Sudanese, Somali, Eritrean, Iraqi and Syrian.

Looking for Arabic Language Job Readiness Resources?

Source: http://www.accuform.com/safety-sign/caution-eye-protection-required-wgraphic-MTAA605

Source: www.accuform.com

In case you didn’t know, YOU are our greatest resource! After receiving several requests for Arabic language resources, we put out a call for resources earlier this month, and sure enough, our network responded.

Our friends Ali Abid and Brittani Mcleod from Catholic Community Services of Utah submitted a helpful English/Arabic version of the Walmart job interview, and Carol Tucker from Lutheran Family Services of Nebraska provided us with several other Arabic/English Job Readiness materials.

Visit our Downloadable Resources section to check out these great resources! You may also want to check out a post we published in 2014 that links to picture vocabulary guides in several languages, including Arabic.

As we continue to serve Iraqi refugees and SIV recipients and anticipate increasing numbers of Syrian arrivals, these resources will continue to be a “must have” for your Cultural Orientation and Job Readiness tool box. If you have other Arabic language resources that you would like to share please email us at information@higheradvantage.org.