Cuba Update

cuba

Cubans working in the city of Trinidad

“El red Cubano” – the Cuban community grapevine –  is a powerful mechanism to spread information – real and imagined.

Continued high numbers of Cuban border crosser arrivals suggests worry about possible changes in parolee status and refugee benefit eligibility.

What’s really going on with U.S.-Cuban relations and what changes could be coming inside Cuba and here?  Read further for one official policy statement followed by two tidbits that could suggest larger changes for Cuba and the Cuban community in the U.S.

1.  Official Policy Statement Maintains the Status Quo – For Now

The U.S. State Department has provided a ‘limited interpretation of normalization’ of the U.S.’s diplomatic relationship with the Cuban Government.  Click here to read the entire Fact Sheet released on July 6.

“The Administration has no plans to alter current migration policy, including the Cuban Adjustment Act. The United States continues to support safe, legal and orderly migration from Cuba to the United States and the full implementation of the existing migration accords with Cuba.”

2.  Sending Money to Family in Cuba Still Complicates Achievement of Economic Self-Sufficiency

Previous relaxation of some sanction policies in 2009 ended limits on the amount of remittances to close relatives.  More recent changes increased the limit on remittances to any Cuban national for humanitarian needs from $500 to $2,000 per quarter.

The vast majority of our Cuban clients send money home to suport their family and friends, often at the expense of their own financial self-sufficiency.  For most recently resettled Cubans, their current salaries are a stricter limit on what they’re able to send home than policy limits.  Expansion could make them feel increased pressure to send more.

3.  Inside Cuba, Economic Opportunities Seem to be Expanding

Click here to read a fascinating article about Cuban internet entrepreneurs in Cuba.  Our Cuban clients are genius at understanding how to make the most of the opportunities they have.  They’re joyful, resourceful, creative and independent.

Our media often talks about a “socialist hangover” to describe a sense of entitlement and work ethic that looks different than expected in the U.S. job market. Many of us have heard Cubans share a common expression about work in Cuba.  “We pretend to work and they pretend to pay us.”

As political and socio-economic changes continue in Cuba, it seems likely that socialist attitudes will, too.

Send any additional insight you can share about how ongoing changes are affecting our clients to information@higheradvantage.org

 

 

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