Enhancing Employment Readiness Training through Group Games and Activities

Source: http://www.teachhub.com

For people who are visual, hands-on learners, valuable skills can be taught through professionally styled games and activities.

Whether the “student” employee is a young adult or someone who has been in the workforce for some time, light-hearted approaches to learning can be fun and effective.

Just be careful that your activities don’t come across as too “childish”.

Avoid anything that involves dancing, extreme physical activity or runs the risk of making the participant look or feel foolish or unprofessional.

Here are two activities that you may want to try:

1. Communication Skills Building: Match job training participants in pairs and seat them in chairs facing each other. Then, direct participants to interview one another. Give each person a question-and-answer sheet that includes questions like, “What was the proudest moment of your life, and why?” and, “Who are your heroes, and why?” Instruct the participants to individually stand and describe the other person based on the interview. This activity promotes interpersonal communication skills and builds closeness among participants.

2. Building Confidence in the Workplace: Pair up trainees and assign one person to be the customer and the other to be the employee. Give the customer a card that describes a common customer complaint, such as a defective product, a late delivery or a rude salesperson. Instruct the customer to act out her role and the employee to work toward a solution using your company’s best practices for service excellence (try to come up with a few fake companies and what their best practices would be).

Once the role-playing is complete, critique the exercise and invite other participants to chime in with their thoughts on approach and technique. This activity is great to help clients understand how to deal with rude customers and how to address customers in a friendly, professional manner. This activity emphasizes the important role of a positive attitude not just in the interview process but as part of the everyday work environment. This activity will help clients develop confidence about how they are expected to interact in the workplace and learn additional job requirements that may not always be described in the hiring or orientation process.

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