Gardens Are A Place For Personal Growth

When I was living in Zimbabwe, I remember the initial trip from the airport in Harare to the tiny village where I would end up residing. It took hours to get to our designation. The roads were bad and our jeep was no better. Most of the journey there was not much to look at. A few trees here and there and the occasional passerby headed back to the city. But about two hours into the ride, an oasis was unveiled. A beautiful orange grove started to align both sides of the street and I was mesmerized by how the arid landscape transformed into a lush, green canopy. We stopped and purchased oranges from the local farmer’s roadside stand. The air smelled sweet and the oranges were delicious.

It occurred to me when I was back in the States that the farmer I met on my way that day came from the same place as many of our Zimbabwean asylees. It also occurred to me that many of them must have been farmers with amazing talents and how we (the U.S. resettlement network) must capitalize on those talents. This is why I love a recent article in the Baltimore Sun about a new IRC initiative in Baltimore centered on refugee urban gardening.

You see, farming is much more than cultivating, planting, growing, and harvesting produce. You learn a lot about yourself and your abilities. You are able to cultivate and grow relationships with others as well. Both in working together to yield a harvest and selling produce that feeds those who have come to buy it.

Interested in IRC’s urban gardening initiative, click here.

-Jonathan Lucus,

Director of Higher

 

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