No English Needed to be an Entrepreneur

As Higher begins planning for the 2013 fiscal year, I have been thinking a lot about employment programs that strengthen English and increase a refugee’s marketability in the workforce. It has been long understood that in an economy that is producing few jobs, employers have increased flexibility to pick and choose new hires that need to meet a gold standard – long U.S. work histories, willingness to work unconventional hours, and high level English ability. But what about immigrant entrepreneurs? Do they need to meet the same gold standard?

Well, according to a New York Times article I ran across, the answer may in fact be, no. For immigrants coming to the shore of America with little to no English ability, their ethnic diaspora is avenue that can lead to business success.

Among the individuals highlighted in the New York Times article is Felix Sanchez de la Vega Guzman. (Spoiler Alert) Mr. Sanchez turned a street tortilla business into a $19 million food manufacturing empire. His success can be credited to understanding his own ethnic community and how technology could help him market to his ethnic community all across the U.S. and beyond.

Yes, Mr. Sanchez is one of a relatively small number of people who have been able to succeed at this level without learning English, but he is at no means alone in this endeavor. Click here to read more about these immigrant entrepreneurs.

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