Body Language Tips for Job Developers – Infographic

In most cases, as a Job Developer, you essentially do the first interview for your clients. If you make a good impression, that employer will want to meet your clients. If not, it’s game over.

We often focus on content rather than form, preparing our clients for job interview questions or preparing our “elevator pitch” for employers, but we sometimes forget that most communication is actually non-verbal (about 80% according to this Businesstopia article).

So the next time you focus on interview prep in job readiness class or get ready to walk into an appointment with an employer, keep these 27 body language tips in mind:

body-language-tricks-to-be-instantly-likeable-infographic-2

Want to see a couple more cool info-graphics related to body language for job interviews and business interactions? Check out The Basics of Business Body Language and 7 Body Language Interview Mistakes.

We’d love to highlight your success story about a recent exchange you’ve had with an employer. Get in touch at information@higheradvantage.org.

 

Catching Up on Consultative Selling

DTG-EMP Webinar + New Higher Resource Pack

 

Mark your calendars for an upcoming FREE webinar from our friends at DTG-EMP/Kenfield Consulting. The Employment Outcomes Fundamentals webinar will take place on Tuesday, January 31st, from 9-10 AM Pacific Standard Time and will give an overview of the basics of the Consultative Selling model- a job development model designed for those assisting job seekers with significant barriers to employment. To read the full description and register for the webinar, visit www.dtg-emp.com.

 

For those of you who may be new to the Consultative Selling model, we have created a Consultative Selling Resource Pack, located in the Downloadable Resources section of our website. This resource pack includes links to our 4-part Consultative Selling blog series as well as video recordings of 3 presentations from refugee employment peers who participated in Higher’s 2016 Job Development Community of Practice (CoP), which focused on Consultative Selling.

 

*Note: Illustration on front page by Gary Phelps / EMM Wichita, KS

7 Tips if You’re New To Job Development

If you’re new to refugee job development, welcome to what is sure to be one of the most challenging and rewarding chapters of your career!

Maybe you’re fresh out of college or perhaps you’re a career changer looking for more meaningful work. You are likely very excited about your new position but you’ve probably also had a few moments of wondering what you’ve gotten yourself into.

You have a long and growing list of clients that you need to place and many of them have significant barriers to employment. You’re beginning to think that your title should be Miracle Worker instead of Job Developer. Well guess what? We’ve all been there!

Here are 7 tips to get you through your first few crazy months as a Job Developer:

1. Breathe! What you are experiencing is normal. The work that we do is not easy, but it is rewarding! Murphy’s Law (“whatever can go wrong, will go wrong”) will summarize many of your days as a Job Developer, but there will also be many days where you will celebrate amazing successes with clients and coworkers.

2. Realize that there is a seasonal nature to the work that we do. Ask your coworkers or a supervisor to help you know what to expect at different times in the year. There are times in the year that will be slow and times that will be insane, both in terms of employer hiring and refugee arrivals. October and November will be crazier because of the recent bulge in refugee arrivals and also because employers do a lot of hiring in the fall. December and January are typically slow months in terms of employer hiring.

3. Get a mentor. Mentors are good for your clients, and they are good for you. Find a coworker who is more experienced and ask if they can share what has worked for them, and how they’ve dealt with the challenges of the job. Find an opportunity to “shadow” them as they do employer outreach. After watching them make their pitch to a few employers, try taking the lead on the next few employer visits, and ask your mentor for feedback.

4. Get out of the office! After going out to do employer outreach with your mentor once or twice, get out there and do it yourself. It will be scary. You’ll stumble over your words. You’ll get strange stares and doors slammed in your face. But you’ll get better. Success will come through practice and through getting out there and building relationships with employers. These relationships will not happen by looking at craigslist or doing online job applications; they will happen by you getting out there and “pounding the pavement.”

5. Focus on the Needs of Employers. While there is a humanitarian aspect to the work that we do, focusing on the difficult circumstances of our clients when we speak to employers is not likely to lead to long term partnerships. Employers become partners when they see that you understand the needs and challenges of their business, and can offer them consistent and effective solutions (i.e. motivated, reliable and dependable employees). Over time they may become passionate about helping refugees, but your job is to help them take the first step by convincing them that hiring a refugee is good for their business.

6. Have balanced expectations of your clients. Never underestimate your clients. Don’t be too pessimistic. Refugees are survivors and some of the most resilient people on the planet. You will feel like it’s impossible for some of your clients to get and keep jobs. Many of your clients will prove you wrong. On the other hand, be careful about being overly-optimistic about your clients with higher levels of English and literacy. Starting over in a new culture is a huge challenge for all refugees. Higher skilled clients have their own share of challenges, whether those be unrealistic expectations, trauma, or cultural adjustment issues. Regardless of skill level, the key is to identify barriers to employment early and work with your clients to develop an employment strategy that helps them overcome these challenges.

7. Sign up for Higher’s Online Learning Institute. Our eLearning modules will get you up to speed on best practices in the field ranging from conducting employability assessments, to communicating with employers, to writing effective case notes. Learn more about Higher’s Online Learning Institute here.

 

Consultative Selling Resource Pack

In the past couple years Higher has introduced our network to a job development model known as Consultative Selling. In addition to providing training on Consultative Selling at various Higher training events, we also published a four-part blog series and facilitated a 1-year online Community of Practice (CoP) group focused on adapting this model for refugee employment.

In order to continue helping our network learn and practice this approach to job development, we put together this resource pack, including our intitial Consultative Selling blog series and recordings of all 3 CoP calls.

Consultative Selling Blog Series

Click on the links below to read Higher’s 4-part blog series on the four primary aspects of the Consultative Selling model: Prospecting, Needs Analysis, Selling, and Follow-up:

Illustration by Gary Phelps / EMM Wichita

Part One:Hitting the Target: Prospecting Techniques That Work

Part Two:Understanding Employers’ Needs and Providing Solutions

Part Three:Providing and Selling Workforce Solutions

Part Four:Strengthening Employer Relationships Through Effective Follow-up


2016 Job Development Community of Practice (3 Presentations)

In 2016 Higher facilitated a Community of Practice (CoP) for refugee employment staff who had attended the one day training put on by Allen Anderson at our Second Annual Refugee Employment Workshop in November 2015 in Omaha, NE (to hear a little bit from Allen, check out the Innovations and Opportunities panel discussion from our Second Annual Refugee Employment Workshop page).

Over time the CoP expanded to include coworkers of the original members, and other refugee employment staff who received Consultative Selling training from Higher at separate events. You can access video recordings of these three online events below:

 

  

   

For more on Consultative Selling, click here.

If you are using this model, we would love to hear about your experience. Please email us at information@higheradvantage.org.

Holiday Outreach Strategy + Holiday Graphic!

Showing appreciation for your employer partners is easier than ever before.

We designed this holiday graphic to provide you with an easy and quick way to send a thank you email to employers and community partners. 

You can do it in three easy steps:

1. Download a high resolution JPEG by right clicking on the below image and selecting “Save As”.

higher-holiday-card 2016

(or Download a PDF here)

2. Add your agency logo and message to an email.

3. Hit send.

Do you have a holiday outreach strategy that works? Please share in the comments below or contact us with the details!  

Volunteer Engagement: A Two-Part Series

8 Ways Volunteers Can Support Refugee Employment – Part 1

hs-245-laura-1Guest post by Laura Griffin, Program Coordinator for Volunteerism at LIRS 

We all know the feeling of not having enough hours in the day. One way to stretch your ability to serve refugee clients is to make volunteer support a core part of your employment program. 

A few weeks ago, I sat down with dozens of people from refugee employment programs around the country to ask: How do volunteers and interns support your work?

Here are 8 Ways to Leverage Volunteer Support for Refugee Employment:

1. One-on-One Job Readiness Support 

Volunteers can sit down with individual clients to practice for interviews, edit resumes, fill out job applications, and/or practice skills like how to use the computer to search for jobs.

2. Guest Speakers and Experts

Bring in volunteers as guest speakers from relevant fields (like IT) to talk with clients about the skills employers in their industry look for in job applicants.

3. Support for Highly Skilled Clients

Volunteers can provide individualized job readiness and placement assistance to highly skilled refugee clients.

4. Mentoringmentoring

Mentoring can focus on advanced job readiness training or industry-specific mentoring. If you are interested in designing a mentoring program to assist refugees with long-term career planning, see the free LIRS Guide for Employment Mentoring.

5. Assist with Job Development

Volunteers can help establish employer leads through community outreach, targeted calling and online searching. One participant shared that they have volunteers research job opportunities and send initial emails to potential employers to start the conversation.

6. Increase Access to Service

Volunteers can help enable clients to access employment services by providing rides or offering child care during job readiness classes.

7. Career Fairs 

Have volunteers take clients to career fairs and help them follow up with potential job leads

8. Case Support and Service Plans 

While it can seem a bit daunting, many participants shared success stories of having interns and star volunteers manage cases and design service plans.

How do you leverage volunteers and interns?  Leave a comment below or contact us if you use volunteers and interns to support your refugee employment programs.

Part 2 of this series will highlight tips and suggestions for effective volunteer management. 

Related: Additional Employment Volunteer Resources, New Collection of Employment Volunteer Resources

Job Development Fundamentals from Someone Who Knows

Source: http://dialog.ua.edu

Source: http://dialog.ua.edu

What are the fundamentals of job development?

Higher Peer Advisor Carol Tucker from Lutheran Family Services of Nebraska in Omaha weighed in on this important question during a breakout session on job development at our Third Annual Refugee Employment Workshop in Denver.

Here is what she had to say:

1. Always be ready to talk, meet people and have conversations that represent your organization and clients. Have a “philosophy of friendliness.” Always carry your business cards, and always be looking for opportunities to network. Think of it as sewing seeds – things will not always work out immediately, but with time some of those seeds will grow into wonderful employer partnerships.

2. Build trust. Take your cues from the employer and respond accordingly. Share your process, but respect theirs and adjust when necessary. Your goal is to become their “go-to” person. You’ll also build trust by providing ongoing support. Check in regularly and provide helpful materials such as an employer FAQ sheet, cultural backgrounders, or information about the the legal status, documentation and rights that refugees and asylees possess. Be responsive and ready to take action if they call upon you with a problem or need.

3. Leverage all your resources. Think creatively about ways to increase your capacity and connections. Be intentional about partnering with your development department, with faith communities, and with community volunteers.

4. Help employers become partners. Provide opportunities for your employer partners to share their values through involvement – career mentoring, coat drives, world refugee day, family mentoring, or charitable giving. This will help employers not only value your services but be invested in welcoming refugees to the community.

5. Overwhelm them with your passion, love and faith in refugees. Passion is contagious. People know when you are genuine and when you are sold on your product.

For more tips from Carol, check out this video interview!

Have more job development fundamentals to share? Leave a comment below, or share your thoughts with us at information@higheradvantage.org.

Thinking Strategically about Survival Jobs

Source: http://allstarluxury.com

Source: http://allstarluxury.com

It’s never too early to think about the long-term success of our clients. Although our job development efforts are often focused on initial survival jobs for our clients, it’s important to realize that these jobs don’t have to be dead-end jobs. In fact, some of the industries that we commonly place clients in are industries that are expected to experience serious labor shortages.

A recent Fast Company article titled “5 Jobs that Will Be the Hardest to Fill in 2025” summarized a 2016 report by The Conference Board which predicts that the following industries will have the hardest time finding workers in the coming decade:

Skilled Trades– Large numbers of workers are retiring, but fewer young people are choosing these professions. Electricians, machinists, plant and system operators, rail transportation workers and other skilled trades workers will be in high demand.

Health Care– Healthcare workers of all types will be in greater demand in the coming years. Occupational and physical therapy aides, health diagnosing and treating professionals and home health aides are a few of the professions that expect to experience worker shortages.

Manufacturing– U.S. manufacturing will face a shortage of 2 million workers by 2020 in areas ranging from engineering to production workers.

Sales– Everyone knows that sales is a tough gig. In a nation of consumers, companies rely on brilliant sales people, but they struggle to find them. This will continue to be an issue for companies, large and small, in the coming years.

Math-related fields– While STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) fields in general are not predicted to be at risk for shortages, jobs that require specialized mathematical skills are in danger of not finding enough talent. Some of these jobs include actuaries, statisticians, and mathematically-minded professionals to work in the big-data sector.

Perhaps with the exception of sales (which in most cases is not a good fit for newly arrived refugees), these fields have great potential as career pathways for refugee job seekers, whether low-skilled or high-skilled.

Healthcare and manufacturing are common industries that we place newly arrived refugees in, and not only offer entry-level jobs, but in many cases offer a career path as well.

Skilled trades are a bit harder to access, but there are some refugees who come with these skills, and opportunities such as on-the-job training and apprenticeships can be a helpful entry point for clients who have the skills and the English ability.

And finally, while it may be a smaller percentage of our clients, we’ve all met refugees who bring STEM skills, including mathematical skills, who are so impressive that it’s intimidating (let’s be honest!).

So next time you’re doing employer outreach why not focus on one of these industries? You may find a survival job that leads to a long-term career path or you may find an employer who desperately needs the skills that one of your clients just happens to have!

For more on using labor market information for job development, check out our post “Using Data to Drive Job Development.”

3 Fall Job Development Strategies

Photo Credit: Michael Nagle/Getty Images

Photo Credit: Michael Nagle/Getty Images

A surge in arrivals now means that you’ll need strong employer relationships and plenty of job openings this fall.  Hiring slows down over the holidays. Now’s the time to make the next four months count with lots of solid job placements.

Here are three ideas to consider from a previous Higher blog post:

1.  Turnover  in Student-related jobs:  There will be turnover in jobs filled by students as their schedules change for a  new semester.  Campus housing, maintenance and food service jobs will be widely available.  Watch for school district hiring fairs for kitchen and lunchroom monitor jobs.  Great for moms who need part time work around children’s schedules.

2.  Start of busy season for hotels:  Business travel.  Cooler weather. Hotels are gearing up for full occupancy now.  Get in touch with your hotel partners.  Approach a couple of new ones.  Consider organizing a special job readiness session focused on preparing for success in back of the house jobs.

3.  Special events staffing:  State fairs. Fall concerts. Football games. All kinds of special events recruit staff to set-up, serve, and clean up. These opportunities are great to build US work experience or as an interim job while you work on a permanent placement. Aramark and Sodexo are national contractors.  A quick google search or phone call should help you identify local contractors.

And why the turkey suit, you ask?  My favorite college job was delivering flowers in costume, including the Easter bunny and a Thanksgiving turkey!  

Email 101: a Two Part Series

Screen Shot 2016-06-01 at 8.42.09 PM

A screen shot from the infographic

Email signatures:  Make Sure You Have One. Today.

Social media, infographics and vlogs might be trendy. Email is the most common (and cheapest) form of business communication, though. That’s why we’ll offer two companion posts to help you get the most from your email.

Not having an email signature can mean that employers who want to follow-up take the easy path to call a staffing agency. Who knows when a contact suddenly hears about a job and needs to find you quickly?

It’s hard to contact decisions-makers when you’re prospecting.  You can often access high level employer contacts easily and directly via email. Don’t let that security guard or receptionist shut you down!

According to a careersherpa,net Infographic, 48% of professionals don’t have an email signature. This is no surprise based on how many emails in Higher’s inbox don’t include one.  

The Infographic offers  seven tips for creating a good email signature. You can read them for yourself here.  The most important thing is to start using an email signature today. A quick google search will give you easy instructions for how to set it up.  

Higher also advises to include your email signature in replies as well as email you generate. Send us an email to show off your new email signature!