Webinar Announcement from DOL: Using Storytelling to Share Your Program Successes

Registration for this event is limited and seating is on a first-come, first-served basis; please register today.

Higher Network, let the great work you are doing in employment speak for itself through the art of storytelling. 

Tell a person a fact, they may remember it for a day or two.  Tell them a memorable story, they are likely to remember it for a lifetime.
Whether you are recruiting participants, engaging employers, or seeking financial support for your project, story-telling is one of the most powerful tools you can use to achieve your objectives.

This webinar will provide you with practical tips and guidance for telling a story that will evoke emotion, get your message across, and win support for your efforts.

You will learn how to:

  • Help your audience visualize your story.
  • Draw people into your story through the absence of information.
  • Get your audience to sit up and take notice.
  • Get your message across in a way that “sticks.”

If your seeking to improve the stories you tell your customers and the public, please join us for this informative webinar.

Presenter(s):

John Rakis, REO Technical Assistance Coach, Coffey Consulting LLC

Lenora Thompson, REO Technical Assistance Coach, Coffey Consulting LLC

Moderator(s):

Richard Morris, Program Analyst, U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration

 

When: Thursday, October 05, 2017

Time: 2:00 PM-3:30 PM ET

Register here to attend

Please note that to register, participants will have to create a DOL account, if they don’t already have one.

Models for Integrating Language and Workforce Development Skills

A few months ago, I had the opportunity to attend a 1-day conference at Johns Hopkins University’s American Institute for Contemporary German Studies in Washington D.C. The theme of the conference was “Integrating Migrants into the Workforce” and focused on immigrant integration efforts in both Germany and the U.S.

One of the most interesting presentations I heard was by Dr. Heidi Wrigley from Literacy Work International. The Presentation focused on models in the U.S. that are leading the way in offering both English instruction and vocational training.

Here are four models that Dr. Wrigley highlighted:

McDonald’s: English Under the Arches

English Under the Arches (EUA) is one of four Archways to Opportunities programs designed to help employees grow professionally.

The program launched in 2007 with the mission to provide English as a Second Language (ESL) classes that teach managers and crew the English they need to communicate effectively and confidently with customers, staff and in their lives outside of McDonald’s.

These classes are free for employees and they are also paid their hourly wage while they are in class. Helping non-native speakers learn English allows them to break down barriers and feel comfortable when communicating effectively with fellow team members, customers, and, most importantly, in their everyday life.

Proficiency in English is often a prerequisite for most jobs in the U.S. and provides mobility for individuals to pursue higher education opportunities, which in turn leads to increased earning power. To learn more about this program, visit the EUA webpage or read the most recent Archways to Opportunity Progress Report.

Seattle Office of Immigrant and Refugee Affairs: Ready to Work

Ready to Work (RTW) is a workforce development program in Seattle, WA designed for immigrants and refugees who face barriers to gaining employment.

The program combines English as a Second Language (ESL) classes with computer literacy instruction and case management to help immigrants gain job readiness skills and take steps toward economic self-sufficiency.

RTW was created as a prototype model of English language acquisition offered in a community-based setting, and focused on career development, and employment. Classes meet four days a week, three hours a day, for a total of 12 hours per week.

Instruction is provided by two Seattle Colleges and Literacy Source (a community-based adult education provider). Unlike many other programs, RTW tracks participants’ progress over a longer time frame than conventional funding streams typically allow.

For more details, see National Skills Coalition’s Amanda Bergson-Shilcock’s blog post from June 2016: Ready to work: Seattle creates new on-ramp for immigrant English learners.

Washington State: I-BEST

Washington’s Integrated Basic Education and Skills Training Program (I-BEST) quickly teaches students literacy, work, and college-readiness skills so they can move through school and into living wage jobs faster.

Pioneered by Washington’s community and technical colleges, I-BEST uses a team-teaching approach.

Students work with two teachers in the classroom: one teacher provides job-training and the other teaches basic skills in reading, math or English language.

Students get the help they need while studying in the career field of their choice. The I-BEST program offers several career pathways including Hospitality, Manufacturing and Nursing.

I-BEST challenges the traditional notion that students must move through a pre-determined sequence of basic education or pre-college (remedial) courses before they can start working on certificates or degrees.

The combined teaching method allows students to work on college-level studies right away, clearing multiple levels with one leap.

Check out this video, which features three students sharing their experience with the I-BEST model:

OneAmerica’s English Innovations

English Innovations (EI) is a blended social learning model that integrates English language learning and combines a collaborative, supportive classroom environment with online tools that enable self-paced, independent learning.

Offered as an alternative approach to conventional systems of language instruction which often do not provide the flexibility and resources that adult immigrants need, the EI program includes:

  • Tailored curriculum framework integrating digital literacy skills & language development
  • Blended model for in-class and self-paced learning through online tools and game-based learning
  • A collaborative classroom environment which facilitates cognitive, social and emotional engagement
  • Tutor-facilitated activities, volunteer involvement, and peer support
  • A model grounded in communities, engaging immigrants and immigrant-serving organizations in advocacy for effective English learning and immigrant integration

How do you see ESL and Vocational Training intersecting in your area? Are you aware of an innovative model that we should highlight? Let us know at information@higheradvantage.org.

*Note: Some language in this post was pulled directly from program websites for the purpose of accurately describing these programs.

 

Models of Collaboration between Workforce Investment and Refugee Resettlement Stakeholders

Models of Collaboration between Workforce Investment and Refugee Resettlement Stakeholders: Jointly commissioned by ORR and ETA, this report highlights three models employed by workforce investment and refugee resettlement stakeholders that are collaborating to support refugees in finding employment. Each model contains elements that could be replicated in any number of settings throughout the country.

May 4-6, 2015: NAWDP 2015 Annual Conference

NAWDP 2015 Annual Conference

May 4-6, 2015  Las Vegas, Nevada

Over 900 workforce professionals from across the nation are expected including: One-Stop Center/AJC Staff, Job Developers, Re-Entry Specialist, Youth Build Grantees, Community College Representatives, Job Corps Professionals, Senior Community and Employment Service Providers, Business and Employer Representatives, WIB Executive Directors, Career and Guidance Counselors, Juvenile Justice Specialists, Educators and Trainers.

Click here to learn more about this event.

5 Things a not-so-Newbie Learned

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

Photo credit: My Dad

…from Higher’s Intro to WIOA Webinar

Newbies like Sarah from yesterday’s post aren’t the only ones who can learn something new. Experienced employment professionals should, too.

Here are 5 things I learned from NAWDP Executive Director Bridget Brown about what’s important for refugees in the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA).  Listen to the webinar recording and see what else you’ll learn.

1.  All workforce centers will now be called American Job Centers (AJCs).  That will help refugees know where to go for assistance if the outmigrate.  Makes it easier for us, too.

2.  Local Workforce Investment Boards (WIB) are powerful.  Local WIBs control contracts for AJC services.  Many of their meetings are open to the public.  Having contacts and context for how this works in your community is really important.

3.  Interim performance measures are designed to encourage centers to serve the hardest-to-serve.  Our clients are often included in that category.  Final performance measures are still being drafted, reviewed and finalized.

4.  75% of youth funding must be dedicated to out of school youth up to 24 years old.  This likely means more resources focused on work readiness and skill training.  Great for our clients who qualify!

5.  “Sequencing of services” has been eliminated.  Clients can access the service they need without first accepting those they don’t. Here’s a true story(mine) to illustrate why this will really benefit our clients and us.

My client Adell was offered a promotion from his employer if he obtained his commercial drivers license.  He was eligible for free short term CDL training through the local AJC.  First, he had to attend orientation, put his profile into a database, attend two intake meetings with an AJC case worker and attend a workshop.  He needed my help to navigate the system, so I did all of that, too.  Four months later, his work schedule changed before he could start the training and he couldn’t attend anyway.  (Adell is now a long haul truck driver with a CDL and his own truck.  This experience was frustrating for him, me and the AJC staff.  We all really wanted it  to work.  I’m determined to help make things easier for all of us with WIOA!)

Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA)

A collection of resources from Higher and the National Association of Workforce Development Professionals (NAWDP) about the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) from a 12/16 webinar. You can also access a recording of this webinar at Higher’s webinar archive page.

  • ORR State Letter 13-04: ORR Collaboration with the Department of Labor Click here
  • ORR August 2014 Report: Models of Collaboration between Workforce Investment and Refugee Resettlement Stakeholders Click here
  • Senior Community Service Employment Program (SC-SEP) Click here
  • Finding a One Stop, Workforce Investment Board (WIB) or State WIB Click here
  • Information on Apprenticeships
  • Adult Education and Literacy Act WIA and WIOA Comparison Matrix Click here
  • Summary of Major Policies Included in Title I of WIOA from a Disability Perspective Click here

American Job Center Overview

Department of Labor Fact Sheets

  • American Job Center Overview – With nearly 2,800 delivery points nationwide, American Job Centers, also known as One-Stop Career Centers, provide a vast network to address the human resource and employment needs of both job seekers and business in every community.
  • Workforce System Overview – Provides a general overview of how funding flows from the Department of Labor to the local level.