How to Stay Organized as a Job Developer

  1. Make lists. Start each day by prioritizing a list of tasks that need to be completed. This can assist you in identifying what is urgent and what is not. When emergencies do come up (as they often do) and you drop tasks to deal with it, knowing what other responsibilities must get done today versus what you can finish tomorrow can keep stress levels down.

  1. Use a planner. A paper planner or one on a device or computer can help track appointments and tasks. Keeping appointments with employers and clients is crucial to success. Not attending a scheduled appointment is a good way not to impress a potential employer.

 

  1. Schedule basic tasks. Scheduling time in your day for activities like case noting, returning phone calls and emails, and travel can prevent projects or daily tasks from overwhelming you. Look ahead at deadlines and add reminders in your planner to stay prepared. If setting aside time each day is not possible, try using a “theme” for different days of the week. For example, designating Fridays as case note days and Mondays as staff meeting days increases consideration for the theme selected for that day. While scheduling tasks, remember a 30-minute lunch break can provide relief, recharge your mind and lead to a fresh perspective on tasks for the day. Taking care of yourself is crucial to staying organized and assisting refugees. Stop eating at your desk while responding to emails or eating a granola bar on the way to pick up clients for an interview! Take the 30 minutes (or even 15!) to focus on yourself, eat, and maintain your mental health. Even if you have to schedule a break in your day, you will thank yourself later.

 

  1. Extra Documents. Keep copies of documents on hand that you need every time you meet with prospective employers or current employers. These could include outreach materials, a flyer on the benefits of hiring refugees and business cards. Having extra copies of documents in your bag or car will help you to be prepared for those days when you aren’t.

 

  1. Use Technology. Check out Higher’s previous post on 4 (Free) Productivity Tools for the Busy Job Developer for some technology that can save time and help you organize. As applications for devices change frequently, we selected four additional applications that may interest job developers:
  • Mileage IQ can track your mileage on a monthly basis.
  • TinyScan can help you scan (take a picture) of a document, save as a PDF, and share via email, all from your cell phone.
  • Dropbox and Google Drive are two other tools that make creating, editing and sharing documents simpler but keep in mind client confidentiality and privacy when using them.

 

  1. At the end of the day, clear your desk. A clean or organized office can clear your mind, looks good, and can support you to focus on the important tasks of the day. You can do this by sorting piles, putting documents away in file folders, or placing items into your shred box under your desk (get one if you already don’t have one). While you are cataloging files, remember to make note of any outstanding tasks or create an “urgent” stack of documents.

Starting to get organized can be the hardest part and while every day brings a new challenge to tackle, as job developers, using strategies like these to become and stay organized will reduce stress and benefit clients.

What are some ways you stay organized? Share your tips with us at .

Jobs for the Future Seeks Session Proposals

Jobs for the Future is accepting proposals for its biannual national summit, Horizons 2018: A Vision for Economic Advancement, is June 13-14, 2018 in New Orleans, LA. Jobs for the Future’s mission is that all lower-income young people and workers have the skills and credentials needed to succeed in our economy.

Proposals should be in one of the following topics to represent refugee employment successes and challenges at the summit in June:

  • The Equity Imperative: Sessions will examine persistent disparities in outcomes for groups that our education and workforce systems are currently leaving behind. Presenters will elevate strategies that provide more equitable opportunities for workers to gain the skills, credentials, and experiences to meet employer needs and their potential.
  • Skills for the Future: Sessions will explore innovative approaches to build and assess these skills, including competency-based education to accelerate learning, and strategies for creating stronger, more agile feedback loops between employers and educators about skill needs. Presenters will highlight promising solutions for ensuring that youth and adults complete high school and postsecondary programs of high value to regional economies.
  • Solutions at Work: Presenters will showcase proven innovations and breakthrough ideas that foster more powerful practice, successful programs, and improved systems.

The deadline for proposal submissions is Dec. 31, 2017. You can read more about the conference and download the session proposal application here.

Written by Carrie Thiele.

Frontline Perspective: Former Refugees Now Working in Refugee Employment Share Their Advice

Many of our colleagues in refugee employment are former refugees. These staff members bring with them valuable first-hand knowledge of the refugee experience, critical language skills, and a unique perspective that benefits us all.

It’s important to acknowledge, however, the personal challenges and cultural adjustment that these staff members have successfully navigated (or are currently navigating) in order to be effective in their roles.

Speaking about his own experience getting started in refugee resettlement and employment services in 2011, former Higher Peer Advisor Subash Acharya says:

 “[As a Job Developer coming from a different cultural background] I found it challenging to build rapport with employers in the beginning…Many did not feel comfortable with me because they had never worked with someone like me in the past.”

Over time Subash developed strategies for overcoming these challenges, and  eventually was promoted to Employment Services Coordinator at Ascentria Care Alliance in Concord, NH. In this role he managed a successful refugee employment program from 2015-2017, before transitioning out of refugee services in order to pursue the next steps in his own professional journey.

We wondered what the experience of other former refugees now working in refugee employment has been like, so during a breakout session at Higher’s 3rd Annual Refugee Employment Workshop, we asked these individuals to answer 3 questions:

  1. What was your biggest challenge when you began working in refugee employment?
  2. What advice do you have for new refugee employment staff coming from a refugee background?
  3. How can management at resettlement agencies support staff coming from a refugee background?

Here is what they had to say:

Biggest Challenges of refugee employment staff from a refugee background (past and present challenges)

  • Adapting to a new culture while trying to help others (many from cultures different from mine) adapt at the same time can be difficult.
  • Clients from my culture often have higher expectations of me and sometimes expect me to show them favoritism.
  • Coworkers, clients and employers sometimes have had difficulty understanding my accent.
  • Coming from a different culture, early on I had some difficulty building relationships with American employers.

Advice for refugee employment staff from a refugee background

  • Be open-minded and not too judgmental towards your coworkers and clients.
  • Stop…think about when you first arrived. Then act. Your perspective as a former refugee will help you.
  • Be flexible, and don’t take things personally.
  • Work hard on your own cultural adaptation so that you can set an example for clients.

Advice for management about hiring and working with staff from a refugee background

  • Provide additional cultural orientation and be patient as these staff members continue to adapt to American culture.
  • Don’t just hire for language ability; hire former refugees who have some experience with American culture as well as the professional skills necessary for the job.
  • Just like clients, former refugees now working in refugee employment services are adjusting to general American culture as well as American workplace culture. Set these team members up for success by clearly communicating professional expectations and office etiquette.
  • Respect the unique perspective of the former refugees on your team; show an interest in their culture and demonstrate a willingness to learn from them.

We hope that sharing the perspective of our colleagues coming from a refugee background will be a reminder of their vital contributions and provide an opportunity for coworkers and supervisors to think through how they can best support and learn from these staff members.

It’s About Time!

Five Tips for Time Management

When you have limited time and resources, it is critically important to make sure you are using your time well. What tasks end up taking most of your time?

Do those tasks lead to the outcomes you need, or do you find that these tasks are using up important time and energy that would be better spent elsewhere? What can you do to correct course and stay focused on what’s most important?

Consider these tips, inspired by an article entitled “How to Manage Time with 10 Tips that Work,” which was posted a few years ago on Entrepreneur.com:

Do a time study: Track your time for a week to see where it all goes. This will help you identify where adjustments are needed by identifying the areas of your work where you are spending too much or too little time.

Make appointments with yourself: Block out time for your most important tasks, thoughts or conversations. Schedule time to deal with emails and phone calls so that they are not a constant distraction. Unplug (shut off your email or silence your phone) when you have a really important task to work on.

Stay focused on your results: Plan to spend at least 50 percent of your time engaged in the thoughts, activities and conversations that produce most of your results. Job Developers, for example, should be spending at least 50% of their time on employer outreach or activities directly related to obtaining employment for clients.

Plan on interruptions: Interruptions are inevitable, and part of the daily reality of working in refugee employment. Have a plan for how you are going to handle those unexpected client or employer requests. It may look like setting up a specific time to handle those requests (think “office hours”) or it may make more sense to build a cushion into your time that allows for interruptions (maybe assume that 15-20 minutes of every hour will go to something unexpected). Either way, having a plan for these situations will help.

Know what you want to accomplish and evaluate your own performance: Take five minutes before every call and task to decide what result you want to attain, and five minutes afterwards to evaluate how things went. This will help you refine your approach as you go, and make you more effective, whether you are working on case notes or speaking to an employer.

To read the whole article (which includes a few more tips!) from Entrepreneur.com, click here.

What time management strategies do you use in your work? Let us know in the comments section below!